Does Trenchless Pipelining Really Last 50 Years?

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February 5, 2018
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Some people call it no-dig sewer repair or sewer pipe re-lining, but it is the same process at the end of the day.  We clean out a broken, rusted, or root filled pipe and using a lot of work and fancy equipment we inject and cure an epoxy liner that seals the pipe. You essentially end up with a brand new pipe inside of your old pipe without having to dig up the yard or driveway.  But how durable is it and how long does it last?

Long Lasting

The best lining materials such as the Perma-Liner systems that we use are not just tested to last up to 50 years. They are third party tested to last AT LEAST 50 years. You could dig up your yard and put brand new sewer pipes in and they could crack, be crushed, or get filled with roots long before our pipe liners start to show wear.  The new technology is very impressive and extremely durable. It’s hard to say how much longer than 50 years they will last because the technology hasn’t been around long enough.  It could be that 50 years from now they can verify it will last at least 100 years.


We have been installing trenchless pipe liners for years and we have never had a single warrantee issue, complaint, or problem. Not one.  The quality of the materials is just that good. And since pipe re-lining can be around half the cost of putting in new sewer pipes, it really is a win-win. Longer lasting, faster and cleaner installation, and less expensive.

Extra Benefits 

Often people go to sell their house and fail a sewer test which requires them to repair or replace broken sewer pipes to be able to sell. Digging up the yard is not only twice as expensive but it also really makes the property an eye sore which only hurts attempts to attract buyers. Trenchless pipelining keeps everything looking great and you can sell a house with the peace of mind that the new home owner should never have to think about their sewer pipe ever again.

Learn more about Trenchless Pipelining or read answers to Frequently Asked Questions